STRESS MANAGEMENT


                                            STRESS MANAGEMENT
· Stress is a normal part of life that can either help us learn and grow or can cause us significant problems.
· Stress releases powerful neurochemicals and hormones that prepare us for action (to fight or flee).
· If we don't take action, the stress response can create or worsen health problems.
· Prolonged, uninterrupted, unexpected, and unmanageable stresses are the most damaging.
· Stress can be managed by seeking support from loved ones, regular exercise, meditation or other relaxation techniques, structured timeouts, and learning new coping strategies to create predictability in our lives.
· Many behaviors that increase in times of stress and maladaptive ways of coping with stress -- drugspain medicines, alcohol, smoking, and eating -- actually worsen the stress and can make us more reactive (sensitive) to further stress.
· Risk factors for unmanageable stress include a lack of adequate social support.
· While there are promising treatments for stress, the management of stress is mostly dependent on the ability and willingness of a person to make the changes necessary for a healthy lifestyle.

What is stress?

Stress is a fact of nature in which forces from the inside or outside world affect the individual, either one's emotional or
physical well-being, or both. The individual responds to stress in ways that affect the individual, as well as their environment. Due to the overabundance of stress in our modern lives, we usually think of stress as a negative experience, but from a biological point of view, stress can be a neutral, negative, or positive experience.
In general, stress is related to both external and internal factors. External factors include the physical environment, including your job, your relationships with others, your home, and all the situations, challenges, difficulties, and expectations you're confronted with on a daily basis. Internal factors determine your body's ability to respond to, and deal with, the external stress-inducing factors. Internal factors which influence your ability to handle stress include your nutritional status, overall health and fitness levels, emotional well-being, and the amount of sleep and rest you get.
 Man is the most adaptive creature on the planet because of the evolution of the human brain, especially the part called the neo-cortex. This adaptability is largely due to the changes and stressors that we have faced and mastered. Therefore, we, unlike other animals, can live in any climate or ecosystem, at various altitudes, and avoid the danger of predators. Moreover, we have learned to live in the air, under the sea, and even in space, where no living creatures have ever survived. So then, what is so bad about stress?
STRESS BUSTERS
Most of our lives are filled with family, work, and community obligations, and at some point we feel as though we are "running on empty." Here are eight immediate stress busters to help "fill up the tank!" So take deep relaxing breath and read on.
 Do not allow yourself to waste thought and energy where it isn't deserved. Effective anger management is a tried-and-true stress reducer.
Breathe slowly and deeply. Before reacting to the next stressful occurrence, take three deep breaths and release them slowly. If you have a few minutes, try out a relaxation technique such as meditation or guided imagery.
Whenever you feel overwhelmed by stress, practice speaking more slowly than usual. You'll find that you think more clearly and react more reasonably to stressful situations. Stressed people tend to speak fast and breathlessly; by slowing down your speech you'll also appear less anxious and more in control of any situation.
Jump-start an effective time management strategy. Choose one simple thing you have been putting off (e.g., returning a phone call, making a doctor's appointment), and do it immediately. Just taking care of one nagging responsibility can be energizing and can improve your attitude.
Get outdoors for a brief break. Our grandparents were right about the healing power of fresh air. Don't be deterred by foul weather or a full schedule. Even five minutes on a balcony or terrace can be rejuvenating.
Drink plenty of water and eat small, nutritious snacks. Hunger and dehydration, even before you're aware of them, can provoke aggressiveness and exacerbate feelings of anxiety and stress.
Plan something rewarding for the end of your stressful day, even if only a relaxing bath or half an hour with a good book. Put aside work, housekeeping or family concerns for a brief period before bedtime and allow yourself to fully relax. Don't spend this time planning tomorrow's schedule or doing chores you didn't get around to during the day. Remember that you need time to recharge and energize yourself. You'll be much better prepared to face another stressful day.

Forgiveness (Healthy Lifestyle)

While forgiveness may seem like an antiquated notion our rushed and quick-to-react society, there are many health benefits to it, even today.
When you are consciously able to let something go, even without an apology, it reduces your anger, stress, and tension.
The physical burden of feeling hurt takes a toll on the body, so being able to release those negative feelings and replace them with positivity is a healthy habit.
Choosing to not forgive someone increases your anger and contributes to a feeling of loss of control. Holding onto a grudge can increase muscle tension, heart rate, and blood pressure, which are all harmful to your health.
Finally, being able to forgive can strengthen your relationship with your friends and family. Avoiding deep-seeded strains in close relationships is an important part of feeling connected to those around you and living life in harmony with people who cross your path. Maintaining healthy relationships is a key component of living a healthy lifestyle.
1)Don't go to sleep angry.
2). Focus on understanding yourself instead of blaming others.
3)Live in the present instead of being stuck in the past.
4). Do it for yourself and your own peace of mind.
5). Remember the times when you were forgiven.
6). Remember people when they were children.
7). Remember why you love people.
8). Remember that it's better to be kind instead of right.
9). Observe, don't judge.
10). Take responsibility for your own shortcomings.
11). Acknowledge your growth from the experience.

What are the symptoms and effects of excess stress or "out-of-control" stress?

Manifestations of excess or poorly managed stress can be extremely varied. While many people report that stress induces headachessleep disturbances, feelings of anxiety or tension, anger, or concentration problems, others may complain of depression, lack of interest in food, increased appetite, or any number of other symptoms. In severe situations, one can experience overwhelming stress to the point of so-called "burnout," with loss of interest in normal activities.
              

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